Antique Dolls
Although dolls made of wood, terracotta, cloth and ivory have been preserved since ancient times of Greece and Rome, for most collectors the history of dolls begins in the XVIII…

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Rococo
Rococo (French rococo - fanciful, quaint from rocaille - rocky from roc - rock, cliff). Rococo - the original art style, developed in the art of France, the first half…

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Monet Claude Oscar

Claude Oscar Monet was born in Paris on November 14, 1840. When the future artist was five years old, his family moved to the port city of Le Havre on the Normandy coast, where Monet spent his childhood and early youth. At school, Monet mediocre in all subjects, except for one – drawing, where Claude showed the innate talent of the artist, and first of all as a cartoonist. At 15, he was already selling his caricatures and even gained some fame locally. Around the same time, Monet met the artist Eugene Boudin, who convinced Claude to practice on landscapes, and the young Monet discovered that this was his vocation. Buden loved to write in nature, because he believed that only in this way could the artist see what he had seen in all purity and freshness. Monet was fascinated by this idea, and subsequently it became one of the cornerstones, both for the artist’s own work and for the whole of impressionism as a whole.
1859-1860 Monet spent in Paris, where he studied art. His student life, like the early years of his career as an artist, was often overshadowed by financial difficulties, since Claude remained completely dependent on his father. However, in 1861-1862, significant changes occurred in the life of the artist. He is sent to military service in Algeria. As an artist, Monet was fascinated by the landscapes of North Africa, but soon fell ill with anemia and was demobilized. In the autumn of 1862, Monet returned to Paris and became a student of Charles Gleire, a famous painter at the time. Lessons gave Glaire lessons to Monet in his workshop, but here he met young artists, some of whom became not only his friends, but also entered the Impressionist group.
In the workshop of Gleyre Monet remained until 1864. The following year, the Paris Salon selected two of his paintings for his annual exhibition, and this was perhaps the only opportunity for an artist to become known to the general public.
However, Monet was not able to stay on the crest of the initial success. In 1867, lack of money forced him to return to Le Havre. By this time he had a beloved, Camilla Donsieu, whom he met in 1865, who gave birth to his son in Paris at the time when Monet himself was in his father’s house. Probably, this period in the life of Monet was the worst in his life. The artist started having problems with his vision, although, thank God, they turned out to be temporary.
In 1870, Monet married Camille. At the end of 1871, Monet returned to Paris and hired a house in Argenteuil, a small town on the banks of the Seine. Monet was completely fascinated by the boats, bridges, river and nature around Argenteuil, and his paintings and drawings from that period can rightfully be called the sunniest in his life. Argenteuil remained for Monet’s house until 1878. Here he was often visited by friends, including Manet, Renoir and Sisley, and their works also bear the imprint of the happy, relaxed atmosphere of this place.
In 1874, the Impressionists staged a group exhibition of their works in Paris. However, at that time they also called themselves the “Joint-stock society of artists-painters” – a bit later one of the observers clung to the name of one of Monet’s paintings – “Impression. Sunrise ”, as a result of which the name was born – impressionism. The artists themselves began to officially call themselves Impressionists from 1877, when their works made up a third of the total number of paintings exhibited at the joint exhibition. Such exhibitions helped the Impressionists gradually strengthened their reputation as the audience began to get used to the bright colors and careless strokes on their canvases.
For a short time, Monet entrusted the management of his financial affairs to Ernest Goshede, a businessman who bought paintings by the artist. Unfortunately, in 1878, Goshede went bankrupt. The following year, the Monet and Goshede families pooled their remaining money and moved to Veteuil, a village on the banks of the Seine north-west of Paris.
Shortly after the move, Monet’s second son, Michel, is born. In 1881, the family of Monet left Veteuil and moved to Giverny. It was here that Monet and spent the rest of his life.
By this time, Monet’s career steeply climbed the mountain. For 50 years, Monet became quite wealthy man. This success allowed him to expand the garden at Giverny, which is now his greatest love, and perhaps the only object that Monet portrayed in his later canvases ..
Once Monet admitted that the two biggest passions in his life are painting and gardening. When he wrote flowers, both of these passions united. In the Field of Poppies, as in many of her other canvases, Monet enjoys wild, vibrant colors. There are several beautiful Monet’s still lifes with cut flowers, but most of all he loved to write flowers that grew in his gardens, first in Argenteuil, and later in Giverny. In 1871, Monet and his family moved to Argenteuil to find there their first home and their first garden. However, the main passion in the life of the artist was his garden in Giverny.

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