Found stolen paintings by Hans Hoffman
The stolen paintings by master of abstract expressionism Hans Hoffman (1880-1966) were found by Art Recovery International 12 years after they were stolen from an art store in Manhattan. Five…

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The exhibition of national art opened in the "Manege"
The works of Qatari artists and photographers make up almost half of the total number of exhibits: the rest is the works of foreign authors (expats and guest artists) and…

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Military Antiques

The history of weapons and other military subjects is for the most part a series of technical improvements in the means of killing or defending enemies. In addition, gunsmiths pursued another goal: to make weapons not only effective, but also beautiful, so that a rich client could boast of it by hanging, for example, on the wall. Indeed, aesthetic motifs were often more important than functional ones, and many weapons became purely decorative.
Many types of weapons and forms were intended solely for parades or to indicate the rank of their owner, and swords and dirks were not used for fights, but for decorating men. Such weapons can be considered as a work of art and accordingly collect it. Laws implying liability for the possession of modern firearms may pose a barrier to the collector. At the same time, a beautiful weapon forms a specific international market. So even modest collectors have the opportunity to visit weapons fairs, which are now held regularly.
Theoretically, the market should have a huge amount of uniforms from the late 18th and 19th centuries, when military leaders realized that iron armor was useless enough against bullets and cannonballs, and armies began to fight with highly organized units and units consisting of a large number of soldiers. In practice, however, the old form is harder to get than a weapon, since it is difficult to keep it from moths and rotting. The uniform worn by the military in battles of the 20th century is easy to find.
The main type of clothing soldiers of the European countries of the XVII century. there was a buff uniform. Soon, insignia appeared, such as a color belt or a color plume. Some compounds began to wear blue or scarlet uniforms, and by the end of the century, instead of a leather uniform, only a leather band and leather leggings remained in use. Now every army could be recognized by its colors. By the XVIII century. most of the British troops wore a red uniform with colored details, the French were mostly dressed in blue, and the Austrians in white.
But metal armor did not disappear immediately. Lieutenant Cuirassier Regiment in France at the beginning of the XIX century. He continued to wear a metal helmet and cuirass, which still protected cavalrymen from knives. French troops continued to use such a “combined” form until 1914, and the same order existed in Russia, Prussia and Austria.
During World War I, almost all differences between military units on the battlefields disappeared, and everyone wore the same color: the British – khaki, the French – blue, the Germans – gray. Findings of items of ammunition can please the lucky collector.

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